Building a Cash Recycler from the Ground Up

I want to take you on a journey of building something new. Well, maybe not totally new, but taking something that’s out there and making it better, making it really unique.

Some of you have seen press on our soon –to-arrive THR-250 Cash Recycler. I get a lot of questions about its cost, functionality and capacity. All of those are important, but the main word I want to focus on here is ‘simplicity.’ I love the statement attributed to the inventor Miguel Lopez, “Why does a cash recycler have to be so complex? It doesn’t!”

I have two confessions: I am not smart enough to figure out a complex machine. I am also completely sold on the THR 250 and how easy it is to use.

This recycler was built from the ground up with the idea of simplicity but no preconceived notions of how it should work. Of course it has to recognize money, detect counterfeits and separate bills for recycling, but beyond that there is a wave of complexity to many machines that needed to be reexamined.

With the THR 250, the note path is short, straight and forgiving. Gone are the multiple belt paths (I’ve also heard them called ‘multiple jam paths’). We have added functionality to accept but separate unfit currency, giving the user the ability to spend less time sorting notes before putting them inside the machine.

Now that said, there are many functions that still blow me away. The ability to scan serial numbers and checks, a 3,000 note offload cassette, the ability to change from small to large capacity drums or to cassettes with no software changes at all.

So this is a great machine, but where is it? In this case, we want to err on the side of perfection. Sample units are currently being performance tested, middleware certified and select banking system certifications are in process. We want this machine to be ready for action out of the box. I expect to see this machine on the market in late August 2015. Get ready.

~James

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